ANNALS OF THE WAR WRITTEN BY LEADING PARTICIPANTS NORTH AND SOUTH. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE PHILADELPHIA WEEKLY TIMES.

McClure, A. K. (Ed.).


£25.00




The Blue & Grey Press, New Jersey, 1st ed., 1996. 839 pp., small sketches. D.j., 24 x 16cm. FINE. The "Annals of the War’ series was the creation of Alexander K. McClure, Philadelphia newspaperman and Republican politician who had been a staunch supporter of Lincoln and the war effort. Appalled by the overly-partisan and "heedlessly imperfect" histories of the war published thus far, McClure determined to gather accounts from both Northern and Southern participants in order that future historians would have primary material with which to work. In 1877, he launched the highly-successful Philadelphia Weekly Times, with contributions from Union and Confederate veterans. Two years later, McClure selected 56 of the best articles and published the 800-page Annals of the War which spanned the entire spectrum of the Civil War. Readers will find several important Gettysburg-related articles, especially those by Confederates trying to assess why Lee lost the battle. Subordinates of Stonewall Jackson recalled the great Southern chieftain. Other officers wrote about their relations with General Ulysses S. Grant. There are several great battle accounts, among them Shiloh, Beverly Ford, Charleston, Cedar Creek, and Atlanta. Civilians also contributed their reminiscences. Judge Robert Ould commented on prisoner exchanges, while Gideon Welles wrote about the USS Monitor. Other accounts deal with the Old Capitol Prison, life in Vicksburg during the siege, and the capture of Jefferson Davis in May 1865.


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