SCAPA AND A CAMERA. PICTORIAL IMPRESSIONS OF FIVE YEARS SPENT AT THE GRAND FLEET BASE.

Burrows, C. W.


£150.00




1st.ed., 1921. Xx + 144 pp., frontis., + 181 other photographs & a map (fldg.). Original boards with oval mounted photograph & black lettering ; neatly re-backed in black cloth with gilt lettering. 29 x 22cm. Corners bumped o/w V.G. No book evokes the atmosphere of naval and civilian life, nor describes the bleak and remote landscape of Scapa Flow during the First World War, as this sought-after work by Burrows. The author was Cashier of the Dockyard Section at the Grand Fleet Base from May 1915 to March 1920 and had the perfect opportunity to capture on camera the scenes around him and to write down his impressions of everyday life at the Base. Divided into four parts, Part I The Development of the Base describes how Scapa Flow changed from being an exercise ground for the Home Fleet prior to 1914, to a fully equipped permanent war Base for the Grand Fleet. Part II Scenes around Scapa Flow describes Kirkwall, Stromness, the Standing Stones of Stennis, Maeshowe, Hoy, Ward Hill, and the famous Old Man of Hoy. Also, the Dwarfie Stone, Lyness, Crockness, Long Hope, Kirk Hope and Cantick as well as the local industry and crafts of peat, chair-making, and spinning – cottage industries from a previous age. Part III The Navy at Scapa gives some idea of the huge impact the Royal Navy had on the local community during the war ; the massive number of ships of every type using the Base and the influx of sailors from all over the country. It describes many scenes of naval life while the dreadnoughts rested at anchor. Finally, Part IV The German Ships at Scapa Flow trace their arrival at the Base following the surrender of the German Navy in 1918 and its self-destruction in the following year. The book is illustrated with a folding map and 182 unique photographs. They show many views of British warships, life on their decks in between sea patrols, local topography and island life and industry, the surrender of the German Navy and the scuttling of their once proud fleet in the dark waters of Scapa. The book is dedicated to Earl Beatty and the officers and men of the Grand Fleet, with an introduction by Vice-Admiral F. S. Miller, CB, Rear-Admiral Scapa Flow 1914-1916.


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