A NARRATIVE OF THE LOSS OF THE ROYAL GEORGE AT SPITHEAD, AUGUST, 1782 ; INCLUDING TRACEY’S ATTEMPT TO RAISE HER IN 1783, ALSO COL. PASLEY’S OPERATIONS IN REMOVING THE WRECK, BY REPEATED EXPLOSIONS OF GUNPOWDER, IN THE YEARS 1839-40.

Anonymous. [ Horsey, S. (Publisher) & Slight, Julian ].


£250.00




Portsea : Printed & Published by S. Horsey, Sen., 43, Queen Street, 2nd ed., 1840. 83 pp., Folding frontis. Wooden boards salvaged from the wreck ; spine in black goat ; gold lettering ; marbled free endpapers. 11 x 7cm. Wood slightly chipped ; frontispiece in facsimile ; title-page foxed ; o/w V.G. The ROYAL GEORGE was a 1st Rate ship-of-the-line of 100 guns and her construction began at Woolwich in 1746 when she was laid down as the ROYAL ANNE. Her name was changed ten years later. The ROYAL GEORGE knew the sound of battle and served as flag ship of some of the greatest admirals of her day : Lord Anson, Admiral Boscawen, Lord Rodney and Lord Hawke being among them. In 1782 she was performing this role for Admiral Richard Kempenfelt, lying off Spithead. Five or six hundred men went over to her larboard side to fetch up the guns, but the larboard lower deck ports had been left open resulting in the sea rushing in and very quickly turning the ship over and taking many of her crew (and a number of women on board) to the bottom. In 1834 a dive was made on her wreck and over the next few years, into the 1840s, several salvage operations recovered artefacts and pieces of timber – a portion of the latter used by Henry Slight and his son Julian to bind their books published in several editions during the early 1840s. The book contains a history of the ship, descriptions of her tragic loss, and accounts of the diving operations upon the wreck.


Share this book