A FIRST RATE MAN OF WAR TAKEN FROM THE DOCKYARD PLYMOUTH. AN 1809 HAND-COLOURED CARICATURE OF ADMIRAL SIR GEORGE YOUNG, 1732-1810.

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£500.00




Drawn by E. Coke & pub. by Dighton, Charing Cross, January 1809. Hand-coloured engraving. 48 x 40cm (19" x 15 '") Handsomely mounted & glazed in a Hogarth frame. Very light & faint foxing as usual o/w FINE. [N.B. These engravings were individually hand-coloured and therefore no two engravings are the same. Owing to this being behind glass, we have used another image for the front cover, so there will be slight differences in colour, i.e. the ground Admiral Young stands upon is more grey than green ; the blue of his uniform in our actual engraving is a lighter and more authentic shade of blue.] A wonderful etched caricature of Admiral Sir George Young, (1732-1810), by Robert Dighton the Elder (1752-1814). Dorset-born George Young first went to sea in 1746 in the NAMUR under Edward Boscawen and saw action off the coast of Europe before sailing to India where he fought in the siege of Pondicherry. NAMUR sank in 1749, but by then Young had become a midshipman in the East India Company, re-entering the Royal Navy to fight in the Seven Years' War, serving under Hugh Pigot and participating in the campaigns against Louisbourg and Quebec. As a lieutenant he sailed for the West Indies and took part in the campaign against Havana, going on to command the Africa squadron. In 1777 he was back in India, this time under Vernon, participating in the capture of Pondicherry. In 1781 he commanded the royal yacht ' the year he was knighted ' and made admiral in 1804. A friend of Lord Sandwich, Young was a handsome, socially graceful and competent officer, fond of music and a supporter of the anti-slave movement. This caricature was etched a year before his death which took place at his country seat in 1810. FINE example of this plate.


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