AN ACCURATE REPRESENTATION OF THE POSITION OF THE BRITISH FLEET UNDER ADML. NELSON, AND THE FRENCH FLEET UNDER ADML. BRUEYS. AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE GLORIOUS ACTION FOUGHT AT THE MOUTH OF THE NILE, AUGUST 1ST 1798.

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£1,000.00




Pub. Oct. 8th, 1798 by John Wallis. No. 16 Ludgate Street, London. Single sheet, hand-coloured, 51 x 41cm (20" x 16"). Laid down (loosely ' not pasted) on card. Some tears with small loss along centre fold ; slightly frayed at edges ; o/w colours fresh & free from foxing : V.G. The British victory in Aboukir Bay on the coast of Egypt on the 1st / 2nd August 1798, was arguably Lord Nelson's most remarkable and spectacular battle. The French fleet had managed to avoid the Royal Navy and land its army, led by Buonaparte, on Egyptian soil. Admiral Brueys, who had calculated that no enemy ship would dare approach his fleet anchored in such shallow water, watched in disbelief as Nelson's ships felt their way forward and each positioned itself opposite an opponent. When dawn broke the next day, the French fleets was all but annihilated and the French army found itself stranded in Egypt. In England, many broadsheets, prints, pamphlets and other celebratory souvenirs were rushed off the press ; this particular example is RARE. It provides a hand-coloured battle-plan of the Nile (32 x 23cm) showing the mouth of the river, the beaches on which the local inhabitants stood and watched the battle ; the fort, island and battery, the track of the British ships (with CULLODEN grounded on the shoals), the British and French flags, and the position of both fleets with the name and number of guns of both British and French ships. Beneath the plan there is Nelson's dispatches of the 3rd and 7th August, printed in the London Gazette Extraordinary for the 2nd October 1798 ; the English and French lines of battle (with ship, captain's name, number of guns, and number of men ; plus Return of the Killed and Wounded in his Majesty's Ships, Aug, 1, 1798. This attractive plan was published only six days after the news of the victory was received and published in London.


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