COVERT WARFARE : INTELLIGENCE, COUNTERINTELLIGENCE, AND MILITARY DECEPTION DURING THE WORLD WAR II ERA. NO. 7 : THE CASE OF RICHARD SORGE.

Mendelsohn, John, (Ed.).


£100.00




Garland Publishing, 1st ed., 1989. Numerous pages in various sections, various photo-ills., + some ills. Original green cloth ; 31 x 23cm. Occasional light blemish to covers o/w FINE. This volume is number 7 in a series of 18 that have been reproduced from copies in the US National Archives and it explores the case of Dr. Richard Sorge, 1895-1944, whose espionage activities on behalf of the Soviet Union have become legendary. The decision to proclaim Sorge posthumously a "Hero of the Soviet Union" on November 6, 1964, was of great significance in that it was the first "official" recognition of the existence of Soviet espionage. The successes achieved by Sorge's intelligence collection efforts in Shanghai and particularly in Tokyo during the critical years 1930-1942 rank among the most important in the history of intelligence operations. As an intellectual and journalist feigning National Socialist sympathies, Sorge was later able to gain a position of trust within German military and diplomatic circles in China and Japan prior to and during the early years of World War II. Using intrigue and manipulation, the "Sorge ring" was able to provide the Fourth Bureau of Red Army Intelligence with a steady stream of high-level political, economic and military intelligence that assisted in Soviet strategic planning. VERY SCARCE.


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