KINSALE. THE SPANISH INTERVENTION IN IRELAND AT THE END OF THE ELIZABETHAN WARS.

Silke, John J.


£45.00




Liverpool University Press, 1st.ed., 1970. Xvi + 208 pp., 10 plates & 2 maps. D.j., 24 x 16cm. Part of dust jacket discoloured (now in a protective sleeve) o/w Nr.FINE. Signed & inscribed by Dr. Nicholas Rodger : "Nicholas Rodger, Acton. Feast of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, 1996." In 1601, the Irish port of Kinsale was occupied by invading Spanish forces and retained control until their surrender to an English army in early 1602. Based on research in Spanish archives, the author tells the story of Spain's final attempt to force an outcome in a long war at sea which had begun in 1585. The prolonged Tudor attempt to reconquer Ireland met its strongest opposition from Hugh O'Neill. Several factors including the mis-trust between Gael and Gall, and O'Neill's failure at diplomacy in the face of prejudices, helped to bring about the decisive English victory at Kinsale. The Peace of London in 1604 in which England and Spain reached an agreement, forced O'Neill to retire to Ulster. English rule was not seriously challenged again for a generation. The occupation of Kinsale has been extensively written on from the Irish perspective, but this is the first time the subject has been systematically examined from the Spanish side. Dr. Silke answers many questions which have hitherto remained obscure, and he places this historic episode in its European and Irish setting.


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