THE CONWAY. FROM HER FOUNDATION TO THE PRESENT DAY.

Masefield, John.


£40.00




FIRST EDITION, 1933. (viii) + 235 pp., frontis + 31 other photo-plates ; pict. e.p's. Blue cloth; gilt ; gilt block-picture of ship to front cover. 23 x 15cm. V.G. History of the old Mersey training ship HMS CONWAY written by one of her most celebrated former cadets, John Masefield. Built at Plymouth in 1839 as the Second-Rate NILE of 91 guns, the ship was loaned by the Admiralty to the Mercantile Marine Service Association of Liverpool in 1876, who had suggested establishing a Merchant training ship in the Mersey as early as 1858. The author describes the history of the ship, renamed CONWAY, down to 1933. He recalls some of her famous cadets, her officers, gunners, masters-at-arms, schoolmasters and instructors ; the rival races between the CONWAY and the WORCESTER, and the cadets who gave their lives in the Great War in both the Merchant Service and in the Royal Navy. Illustrated with 32 photographs including internal and external views. During World War II she was moved from the danger of German bombers over the Mersey, to the more peaceful waters of the Menai Straits. In 1953, she was under tow for Liverpool when the fast-flowing waters of the Straits parted her line and she was wrecked. Her back broken she remained aground for three years until fire destroyed her in 1956.


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