CRIME AND PUNISHMENT IN THE ROYAL NAVY OF THE SEVEN YEARS' WAR, 1755-1763.

Eder, Markus.


£100.00




Ashgate, Aldershot & Burlington, 1st.ed., 2004. Vii + 200 pp., 14 tables. Pict. laminated boards. 24 x 16cm. FINE. Signed & inscribed by Dr. Nicholas Rodger : "Nicholas Rodger, Acton. St. Dorothea's Day 2004. With a copy of Dr. Rodger's Review of this book, pasted in at the rear. Not to be confused with John Byrn's book with a similar title, but covering The Leeward Islands from 1784 to 1812, this later work examines naval justice during an earlier period, the Seven Years' War. The author draws comparisons with criminal historiography in civilian society, the interaction of naval and civil courts, and the variations of punishments for those found guilty between the two. It emerges that courts martial were statistically less likely to hand down capital sentences than their civilian counterparts, and that crimes such as homosexuality, desertion and murder could often be more prevalent on one station than another. The development of Naval Law between 1650 and 1750 is also examined, do too the patterns of crime and punishment in the Royal Navy and the use of mercy and the Navy's pardoning system. FINE copy of a SCARCE work.


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