LIFE OF ADMIRAL OF THE FLEET SIR ARTHUR KNYVET WILSON BART., V.C., G.C.B., O.M., G.C.V.O.

Bradford, Admiral Sir Edward E.


£75.00




John Murray, 1st.ed., 1923. Xi + 257 pp., port. frontis + 7 other photo-plates & ills. Blue grained cloth ; gilt. 22 x 15cm. Spine slightly discoloured ; occasional foxing o/w V.G. Signed & inscribed by Dr. Nicholas Rodger : "Nicholas Rodger, Acton, Feast of Thomas the Apostle 1998. Admiral Sir Arthur Knyvet Wilson (1842-1920) was one of the most distinguished officers in the British Navy of his era ; one of those chiefly responsible for the efficiency of the Fleet in 1914. Born at Swaffham, Norfolk, his family was connected by marriage to the Nelson family. A stern disciplinarian, he was known on the Lower Deck as 'Old 'Ard 'Art' but he had their devotion and they would have followed him anywhere. Wilson made himself master of all the details of the structure and equipment of battleships and introduced improvements which had significant influence upon the First World War and beyond. The author describes Sir Arthur's naval life from 1855 when he first went to sea. He was quickly in action during the Crimean War. Other memorable events in his career include shipwreck in HMS RALEIGH, the China War, the mission to Japan, the war in Egypt during the 1880s, service ashore with the Naval Brigade, early torpedo warfare, reflections on Sir George Tryon who went down in the VICTORIA in 1893, preparations for war and high command in the early years of the last century, and the Naval War Staff at the Admiralty and his role during the First World War. He was awarded the VC for his bravery in hand-to-hand combat armed with his naval sword during his time with the Naval Brigade in 1884.


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