ENGINES OF WAR : HOW WARS WERE WON & LOST ON THE RAILWAYS.

Wolmar, Christian.


£20.00




Atlantic Books, 1st ed., 2010. Xxvi + 310 pp., photo & other plates, some cold. D.j., 24 x 16cm. Tear & repair to rear of d.j., o/w Nr.FINE. Before the birth of the railway in the 1830s, which transformed the nature and intensity of warfare, armies had to rely on slow and unreliable methods of transportation to move soldiers and equipment during conflicts. This book spans more than a century and takes in all the engagements in which railways played a part, including the Crimean War, the American Civil War, the Boer War, both world wars, the Korean War, and the Cold War. By making armies more mobile and increasing the scale and power of weaponry available, railways ensured that wars could be fought across wider fronts and over longer timescales, with far deadlier consequences. The author reveals how railways became a weapon of war exploited to the full by governments across the world.


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