BUILDING THE KAISER’S NAVY. THE IMPERIAL NAVY OFFICE AND GERMAN INDUSTRY IN THE VON TIRPITZ ERA, 1890-1919.

Weir, Gary E.


£50.00




Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, 1st.ed., 1992. Xiii + 295 pp., 15 photo-ills & 2 maps. D.j., 23 x 16cm. FINE. By the end of the 19th century, Germany was prepared to challenge Great Britain’s mastery of the world’s oceans, a position that had remained unchallenged since the defeat of Napoleon in 1815. Germany began to build up a powerful navy of its own, envious of England’s wealth and influence. Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz, commander of the German cruiser squadron of the Far East, was given the task of building up the Kaiser’s Navy. By 1914 the High Seas Fleet was a worthy opponent to the Royal Navy’s Grand Fleet. This American study is the first major historical analysis of the interaction between the Imperial German Navy and the country’s armaments industry during the Tirpitz era. As head of the Imperial Navy Office, (the Reichsmarineamt), von Tirpitz gained leverage over private shipbuilders and arms suppliers, at the same time keeping the Navy independent of government control. The author points out the shortcomings of the German system. For example, those in charge of the fleet’s operations played little part in its creation. Tirpitz, who never commanded the Navy he built, also disregarded the significance of U-boats. The Admiral’s profound influence, however, persisted on down to the Third Reich, with Raeder at its head, a veteran of Jutland and the Kaiser’s era. FINE copy.


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