IAN FLEMING'S COMMANDOS. THE STORY OF 30 ASSAULT UNIT IN WORLD WAR II.

Rankin, Nicholas.


£25.00




Faber & Faber, 1st ed., 2011. Xvi + 397 pp., 16 photo-plates + 2 maps. D.j., 24 x 16cm. FINE. In 1942, Lieutenant-Commander Ian Fleming, RNVR, later the author of James Bond, was personal assistant to the Director of Naval Intelligence (the figure behind the fictional chief, 'M', in the Bond series). Fleming floated the idea of setting up a unique unit of specially-trained fighting men who would go in with front-line troops with the sole purpose of capturing enemy intelligence. Known as '30 Assault Unit', they took part in the North Africa, Sicily, and Normandy landings and helped to liberate Paris. Their greatest achievement came in 1945 when they brought off an amazing coup by seizing the entire archives of the German Navy ' over 300 tons of documents. Ian Fleming flew out in person to supervise their transportation to Britain. The papers were combed for evidence to be used in the Nuremberg trials. This book reveals that Fleming's secret war career was as equally exciting as his fictional hero.


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