COCKBURN AND THE BRITISH NAVY IN TRANSITION. ADMIRAL SIR GEORGE COCKBURN, 1772-1853.

Morriss, Roger.


£45.00




University of Exeter Press, 1st.ed., 1997. Xiv + 338 pp., 9 ills + 11 maps. D.j., 24 x 16cm. FINE. Admiral Sir George Cockburn presided over much of the Royal Navy's difficult transition from sail to steam. He enjoyed a long and varied naval career that included service under Nelson during the Napoleonic Wars, combined operations during the War of 1812, and important administrative and political posts during the first half of the 19th century. Cockburn was renowned for his part in the attack on Washington in 1814, and for escorting Napoleon to St. Helena a year later. But less known, and of greater significance, was his role at the Admiralty Office from 1818 to 1846 where he steered the Navy through some of the most disruptive political and technological changes it had ever had to face. The author examines Cockburn's role and influence with the introduction of the screw propeller, the decline in flogging, the end of impressment and personal patronage. FINE copy.


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