THE PERILOUS ADVENTURES AND VICISSITUDES OF A NAVAL OFFICER 1801-1812. BEING PART OF THE MEMOIRS OF ADMIRAL GEORGE VERNON JACKSON, (1787-1876).

Burrows, Harold. (Ed.).


£125.00




Edinburgh & London, 1st.ed., 1927. Xvii + 242 pp., port. frontis., + 6 other plates & 2 maps. Blue cloth ; gilt. 22 x 15cm. Gilt on spine dull (bright on front cover) ; some shelf wear to extremities of binding & some foxing to the edges as usual, o/w V.G. George Vernon Jackson was born in Charwood, Surrey, in 1787, and entered the Royal Navy in 1801. His naval memoirs begin in that latter year and take the reader up to 1812 when Jackson made his daring escape from France. Family tradition has it that he was the prototype for Marryat's Peter Simple. Jackson began to write his memoirs in 1865 but never got beyond 1812, although the climax reached at this period makes a fitting end to his naval adventures. The book provides a vivid insight into the Navy of the Nelson era and describe the hardships Jackson experienced as a prisoner of the French. The illustrations include two photographs of Jackson as he lived well into the age of photography and died in his 90th year in 1876. As his name was entered in the books of the TRIDENT on the 5th May 1795 at eight years of age, his official connection with the Royal Navy may be said to have lasted eighty-one years.


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