CHURCHILL'S SECRET WAR : DIPLOMATIC DECRYPTS, THE FOREIGN OFFICE AND TURKEY 1942-44.

Denniston, Robin.


£25.00




Stroud, 1st ed., 1997. Xv + 208 pp., photo-plates. D.j., 24 x 16cm. FINE. The author uncovered previously unknown files of diplomatic intercepts which show that Churchill's role in British foreign policy and war planning was far more significant than has hitherto been supposed. He personally exerted considerable influence on British foreign policy to force Turkey into the Second World War on the side of the Allies. This study breaks new ground in our understanding of Churchill's use of secret signals intelligence before and during the war, and Britain's relations with Turkey. It also sheds fresh light on the role of neutral countries such as Turkey, a subject which has never received the attention it merits from war historians. This book brings to light a plan to open a second front in the Balkans, from Turkey across the eastern Mediterranean, to hasten D-Day in the west. He also reveals new information on the Cicero spy scandal in 1943 when top-secret Foreign Office documents were stolen in Ankara by the British Ambassador's valet, who passed them to the Germans - the biggest Foreign Office security lapse until the Burgess and Maclean affair some 20 years later. Here is a scholarly insight into Churchill's 'war within a war'.


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