MUD, BLOOD AND POPPYCOCK : BRITAIN AND THE FIRST WORLD WAR.

Corrigan, Gordon.


£25.00




Cassell, 1st ed., 2003. 431 pp., photo & other plates. D.j., 24 x 16cm. Light blemish to fore-edge o/w FINE. The front of the dust-jacket to this book boldly proclaims "This will overturn everything you thought you knew about Britain and the First World War." The author sets out to demonstrate that the First World War was neither unnecessary nor badly conducted ' two claims made with such frequency in the 1960's that they became the new orthodoxy. He does not deny that mistakes were made by The British Army but he argues that most were honest errors made by men as well trained and as well prepared as they could be, given the unprecedented expansion of the pre-1914 army into a force of over three million men and women. The author also argues that Sir Douglas Haig, far from being the 'butcher and bungler' of popular belief, was the man who took a tiny British army and expanded it, trained it and prepared it, until it was the only Allied army capable of defeating the Germans militarily in 1918.


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