LIVERPOOL SHIPS IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY, INCLUDING THE KING'S SHIPS BUILT THERE, WITH NOTES ON THE PRINCIPAL SHIPWRIGHTS.

Stewart-Brown, R.


£100.00




University Press of Liverpool, etc., 1st.ed., 1932. Xi + 148 pp., frontis + 12 other fine plates. D.j., 25 x 16cm. Light foxing o/w V.G. Uncommon in Dust-Jacket. This is the first account of the building of wooden merchant ships and men-o'-war for the Royal Navy at Liverpool during the 18th century. The whole book contains hitherto unpublished material drawn from local and official records. Between 1700 and 1800 Liverpool rose to become the second seaport in the world, but its role as a shipbuilding centre is less well known. The author unearths from Admiralty records, facts relating to some 36 warships built on the banks of the Mersey for the King's Service, and explains the general working of the Contract System under which vessels were built outside the Royal Dockyards. He also examines the construction of the famous Liverpool privateers and infamous slave ships, and gives details on the local supply of copper, oak and other timber, as well as details of prominent Shipwrights in the area. Additional chapters deal with guns and powder, manning and seamen's bounties, flags used at launches, and other unusual topics. Illustrated with 13 fine plates, including designs for ships' figureheads by R. Lee of Liverpool and Jersey ; the East-Indiaman MERSEY in the Thames in 1776 ; and four draughts of men-o'-war : FURNACE, SUCCESS, GRAMPUS & ECHO.


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