ON A NEW PRINCIPLE OF CONSTRUCTING SHIPS IN THE MERCANTILE NAVY, 1820.

Seppings, Sir Robert.


£100.00




Extracted from Philosophical Transactions, 1820. 11 pp + 4 engraved plates. Bound in blue boards ; paper title-piece to front board ; decorative e.p’s. 29 x 23cm. Foxing o/w FINE. Sir Robert Seppings (1767-1840) was a renowned English naval architect born at Fakenham in Norfolk. Apprenticed at Plymouth Dockyard in 1782, by the year 1800 he had risen to master shipwright assistant and invented the ‘Seppings Blocks’, reducing the time it took to repair ships in graving docks. For this he was awarded £1,000 by the Admiralty and in 1804 promoted to master shipwright at Chatham. Here he continued with his inventions and innovations, was appointed Surveyor of the Navy in 1813, and was knighted in 1819. This paper was read on the 9th March 1820 before the Royal Society, in which Seppings explains his new principle of constructing merchantmen. Previous methods had caused the loss of ships and lives at sea, as the practice had been not to unite the frames or ribs of half of the timbers – a practice common in naval yards up to recent times. The paper is accompanied by four full-page engravings. SCARCE.


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