TYPES OF NAVAL OFFICERS DRAWN FROM THE HISTORY OF THE BRITISH NAVY. WITH SOME ACCOUNT OF THE CONDITIONS OF NAVAL WARFARE AT THE BEGINNING OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY, AND OF ITS SUBSEQUENT DEVELOPMENT DURING THE SAIL PERIOD.

Mahan, Captain A. T.


£80.00




2nd.ed., Sampson Low & Marston, 1904. Xviii + 500 pp., guarded frontis + 5 other port. plates & a battle-plan. Re-bound in superior black cloth ; gilt lettering to spine & front cover ; t.e.g., others uncut. 22 x 15cm. Binding : FINE. Contents : V.G. Captain Mahan, USN, provides an interesting study of the progress of naval warfare during the 18th century by examining closely the methods employed by six British naval officers of the period : Hawke, Rodney, Howe, Jervis, Saumarez and Pellew. It is within this work that Mahan reached the conclusion that there was an unbroken chain of tradition between Hawke and Nelson. Hawke reared William Locker, and Locker in turn taught Nelson when the latter served under him as a lieutenant. Lay a Frenchman close and you will beat him was a sentiment Locker had from Hawke and one Nelson employed to the full at the Nile and at Trafalgar. This book was warmly received when it was first published in England in 1902 : Mahan was already well established as a first-rate naval historian. The book contains some fascinating reflections and opinions regarding Admiral Rodney who broke the line in 1782. Howe is viewed as tactician, Jervis as a disciplinarian and strategist, Saumarez as a fleet officer and division commander, and finally Pellew is viewed as the great frigate captain he was, and as a partisan officer. There are portraits of each of the six naval officers.


Share this book