DICTIONARY OF DISASTERS AT SEA DURING THE AGE OF STEAM. INCLUDING SAILING SHIPS AND SHIPS OF WAR LOST IN ACTION, 1824-1962.

Hocking, Charles.


£200.00




2 Vols., FIRST EDITION, Lloyd’s Register, 1969. Vol. I : A to L, (Viii) + 438 pp. Vol. II : M to Z, pp. 439 to 779. Both volumes in their original blue grained-cloth ; gilt. 28cm x 21cm. Joints & extremities of bindings worn but tight, sound & V.G. This celebrated dictionary covers all shipping casualties between 1824 and 1962 on the high seas, in territorial waters or in inland waters, including ship canals, falling within the following categories : (I) Ships of War (surface) lost by enemy action or by ordinary marine risks. (Merchant ships requisitioned for naval purposes are treated as warships.) (II) British merchant ships of 500 tons gross and over, foreign merchant ships of 1000 tons gross and over, lost by ordinary marine risks with the loss of 5 or more lives. Ships of 10,000 tons gross and over with or without loss of life. (III) British and foreign merchant ships, of 500 and 1,000 tons gross respectively, lost by enemy action in World Wars I and II whether loss of life was reported or not. In addition to these limits, many other losses outside these categories have been included by Lloyd’s for reasons of general interest. The London Stamp Exchange produced a single-volume edition in 1990 ; this is a set of the original two-volume edition of 1969, the result of 15 years painstaking work by Charles Hocking, with a Foreword by the late Admiral Lord Mountevans of Chelsea. The Admiral describes this as “…an international dictionary of disasters at sea during the Age of Steam – a book of absorbing interest, alive with adventure and incident…What a magnificent contribution to the literature of the sea, and what a fair and just appreciation …of shipwrecks, collisions and sinkings through storm and ice, through fog and war.” It also covers the vast numbers of sailing vessels lost during this period.


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