CRIMEAN BLUNDER : THE STORY OF WAR WITH RUSSIA A HUNDRED YEARS AGO.

Gibbs, Peter.


£25.00




1st ed., 1960. 297 pp., frontis-map + 7 other maps + 12 photo-plates. D.j., 22 x 14cm. D.j., repaired with some small chips to edges o/w V.G. Turkey actually defeated the Russians in Bulgaria before the British and French armies arrived at the Crimea in 1854 but the British people were clamouring for military glory and as the enemy had disappeared from the expected field of battle the British and French Governments looked round for another. They sent their armies to invade the Crimea and to capture the Russian naval port of Sebastopol, without any plan of campaign, without even first deciding where the troops were to land. Instead of attacking Sebastopol while it was still weakly defended the allies sat down to besiege the town and were themselves besieged by the Crimean winter. The suffering of the armies was as appalling as were the military and administrative blunders of their leaders. Throughout it all the ordinary British soldier, sacrificed again and again by the stupidity of his commanders, stood steadfast, until at last, after fighting and suffering for a whole year within actual sight of the town, the allies reduced Sebastopol to a heap of ruins and the unnecessary war had begun.


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