HISTORY OF THE LIVERPOOL PRIVATEERS AND LETTERS OF MARQUE, WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE LIVERPOOL SLAVE TRADE.

Williams, Gomer.


£150.00




London & Liverpool, 1st.ed., 1897. Xv + 718 pp., guarded frontis., (fldg.), + 3 facsimiles (all fldg.). Maroon cloth ; gilt ; edges uncut. 23 x 15cm. V.G. The early fortunes of Liverpool Town were built on the success of its privateers and its prominent participation in the slave trade. Divided into two parts, Part I examines Privateering (6 chapters and 5 appendices) while Part II concentrates on The Liverpool Slave Trade (8 chapters and 12 appendices). Turning first to the 'Privateering' section, here the author describes in detail the story of Captain Fortunatus Wright and the origins of Liverpool's privateers in Elizabethan times. He goes on to describe their heyday during the Seven Years' War, the War of American Independence, the Napoleonic Wars and the Naval War of 1812. Appendices list vessels trading to and from Liverpool captured by the enemy during the various wars, and lists the 18th century Liverpool privateers. In the second section dealing with the 'Slave Trade', the author opens with an account of how it originated and thrived, and how Liverpool largely overtook Bristol and London in what was considered to be an acceptable and lucrative trade. He provides whole chapters on Captain John Newton, the massacre at Old Calabar, the Abolition Movement, the horrors of the infamous Middle Passage, Captain Hugh Crow, etc. The appendices provide a great deal of additional information on the slave ships themselves, their owners, captains, voyages and trade. The folding frontispiece is a Letter of Marque of 1779 and the three folding facsimiles include the private signal code of a slave ship and the crew list of a privateer.


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