THE NAVAL GAZETTEER ; OR, SEAMAN'S COMPLETE GUIDE. CONTAINING A FULL AND ACCURATE ACCOUNT, ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED, OF THE SEVERAL COASTS OF ALL THE COUNTRIES AND ISLANDS IN THE KNOWN WORLD : SHEWING THEIR LATITUDE, LONGITUDE, SOUNDINGS, AND STATIONS FOR

Malham, John.


£2,000.00




2 Vols., Printed by M. Allen, 15, Paternoster-row ; for T. Cadell, Jun. & W. Davies, Strand ; a. & J. Black, & J. Parry ; & W. Heather, Leadenhall-street ; & H. D. Symonds, & J. Wallis, Paternoster-row. 2nd ed., 1801. Vol. I : XLII + 560 pp., engrv. chart frontis. (fldg.) + 10 other engrvd. charts (all fldg.). Vol. II : 646 pp., 6 engrvd. charts (all fldg.). Both volumes bound in full contemporary tree calf ; neatly re-backed in calf ; black calf title-pieces to spines ; raised bands ; gold lettering & lines ; speckled edges. 22 x 14cm. Bookplates. Some minor rubbing of original boards ; an exceptionally clean set with all 17 charts being in particularly crisp condition. Overall Nr.FINE in an attractive binding. Contemporary book labels of London booksellers F. Lloyd ; library labels for Kimbolton Castle. (Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Cambridgeshire, is best known as the final home of King Henry VIII's first queen, Catherine of Aragon. Originally a medieval castle but converted into a stately palace, it was the family seat of the Dukes of Manchester from 1615 to 1950. It now houses Kimbolton School. Signature of a contemporary Brigadier-General on e.p.'s & title-pages. First published in 1795, (with an American edition appearing in 1797), this second edition of 1801 of a major and practical naval gazetteer, contains improvements and the addition of almost 4,000 articles not appearing in the original edition. The author, John Malham, (c.1747-1821) was a Yorkshire schoolmaster before going into the Church, returning to teaching during the 1780s when he began to write books on navigation and on various naval affairs, living during the 1790s in Plymouth Dock with his Navigation Made Easy and Familiar (1790) establishing his reputation. He went on to write various sermons (1792) and by 1798 he had settled in Salisbury where he served as chaplain to the county gaol and curate of St. Edmund's, as well as working as a corrector of the press. Malham eventually moved to London where he worked in the book trade and wrote a number of works chiefly on Christian subjects. In this remarkable work he provides a gazetteer and guide for seamen of all the coasts and islands of the then known world. As the long title goes on the show, these include : bays, capes, channels, coves, creeks, currents, gulfs, harbours, havens, lakes, oceans, races, rivers, roads, rocks, sands, shoals, sounds, straits, tides, variation of the compass, &c., &c. He also covers "A particular Relation of the Shape and Appearance at Sea of the several Headlands, Isthmusses, Peninsulas, Points, Promontories, and whatever is of Use or Importance to the Master, Pilot, Commander, or Seaman of any Ship or Vessel, in navigating the watery Element. Also comprehending Ample Directions for sailing into or out of the different Ports, Straits, and Harbours of the four Quarters of the World, and for avoiding Dangers on the various and extended Coasts ; in which near Sixteen Thousand distinct Names of Places, &c., are treated of and explained." The author dedicates the book to their Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty and the work was hailed as a valuable addition to the Seaman's Library ; a Geographical Dictionary of immense use for navigators and undoubtedly saving countless lives from shipwreck. The two volumes are illustrated with 17 engraved folding charts in exceptionally crisp condition. These cover : The World. West Coast of Africa. Southern Coasts of Africa. East Coast of North America. West Coast of North America. Coasts of South America. Baltic Sea. Bay of Biscay. English Channel. West India Islands. Irish Sea with St. George's Channel. Coast of Portugal. Coast of Hindostan. Mediterranean Sea. North Sea. Indian Ocean. And German Ocean. The charts and highly detailed Gazetteer include waters and coast-lines only recently discovered, especially in North America, Alaska and the Pacific Ocean. That for the East Coast of North America for example is very early as the first had


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