NATURAL AND NECESSARY ENEMIES. ANGLO-FRENCH RELATIONS IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

Black, Jeremy.


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1st. ed., 1986. Xii + 220 pp. D.j., 22 x 14cm. FINE. Britain and France had been traditional rivals from the Middle Ages but the situation attained new heights during the 18th century. France was a larger, more populous and more militarised nation than Great Britain, and this enabled it to intervene directly in British politics. She also supported the Jacobite cause and Britain viewed France as a constant threat. The author charts the course of Anglo-French relations during the 18th century, divided into three main periods before the climax came with the Napoleonic Wars : [1] Uneasy peace (1713-1739). [2] Intermittent conflict (1739-1763). [3] Active confrontation (1763-1793). He also examines the different cultures – commercial, religious, artistic and intellectual ; the struggle between the two nations for trade, colonies and sea power.


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