A NAVAL CAREER DURING THE OLD WAR : BEING A NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF ADMIRAL JOHN MARKHAM M.P. FOR PORTSMOUTH FOR TWENTY-THREE YEARS (LORD OF THE ADMIRALTY, 1801-4, AND 1806-7).

Anonymous. (Markham, C. R.)


£150.00




Sampson, Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington ; Crown Buildings, 188 Fleet Street, 1st.ed., 1883. Viii + 289 pp., map frontis; armorial title-page, + 11 other maps & an engrvd. vignette. Original blue cloth with gilt lettering & man-o'-war to spine ; and blind block to front cover with anchor, cannon & gunpowder barrels. ; top edges uncut; decorative e.p's re-cased ; tight & sound. 22 x 15cm. Light foxing ; some of the dye from the blue cloth washed over the gilt on spine o/w V.G.+. The author of this biography, Sir Clements Markham (1830-1916), tells the story of Admiral John Markham (1761-1827) whose signature is often encountered on naval manuscripts of the early 1800s when he served as a Lord of the Admiralty. John Markham was educated at Westminster School where is father was headmaster, and entered the Navy in 1775 aboard the ROMNEY, Captain George Elphinstone. Under this captain, in the PERSEUS, he joined Lord Howe at New York and sailed for the West Indies where he arrived in 1777. During this period, in command of a prize, his ship encountered a storm and began to sink. His crew had got drunk and his prisoners tried to re-take their ship but Markham held them off until rescued by a passing vessel. His death had been reported to his family back in England so there was great rejoicing when they discovered he was still alive. He went on to serve under Sir Andrew Snape Hamond, Admiral Arbuthnot and Admiral Thomas Graves on the North American station during the American War of Independence. He took part in the battle off Cape Henry in 1781 before sailing for Jamaica where Sir Peter Parker gave him command of the fireship VOLCANO and he later served under Rodney. From 1783 to 1786 he held a command in the Mediterranean before going on half-pay for seven years. On the outbreak of war with France in 1793, Markham went out to the West Indies again, this time as part of Jervis's fleet which reduced Martinique. After further service Markham commissioned the CENTAUR at Woolwich in 1797 and sat on the court-martial for the Nore mutiny. In May 1798 he sailed to join St. Vincent off Cadiz and was detached with Duckworth to capture Minorca, later assisting in the blockade of Brest. When St. Vincent went to the Admiralty in 1801 he took Markham with him Markham was closely associated with St. Vincent for the next three years and played a part in the struggle against corruption in the dockyards. He was made rear-admiral in 1804, vice-admiral in 1809, and admiral in 1819. He died and was buried at Naples in 1827. In 1904 the Navy Records Society published selections of Markham's papers whilst he was at the Admiralty 1801-1804, & 1806-1807. His naval career is described in detail in this account of 1883, illustrated with a dozen maps.


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