HAWKINGE 1912-1961: AN IN DEPTH HISTORY OF THE FORMER ROYAL AIR FORCE STATION HAWKINGE.

Humphreys, Roy S.


£20.00




Gillingham, 1st ed., 1981. 192 pp., numerous photo-ills. + ills. + 1 map. Pict., boards; 21 x 15cm. Spine faded overlapping onto front cover o/w V.G. Hawkinge, situated on top of the North Downs, began its aviation history with the mysterious arrival and then silent disappearance of a Dutchman called Megone who, prior to the Great War, secretly invented flying machines that could be used for military application. It is a mammoth task to record in this book all the exploits of the men and their squadrons or units, but the author has covered almost every kind of duty which was performed at RAF Hawkinge, both in peace and war. These duties range from the normal training programme of peacetime squadrons and on to the more skilled aerobatics and air displays. Then, with the outbreak of the Second World War, came the fighter patrols of the Battle of Britain period; the reconnaissance patrols carried out by the famous ‘Jim Crow’ squadron; the air sea rescue patrols; the anti-submarine and convoy protection patrols; the V1 interceptions and bomber escort duties. All of these duties were carried out from RAF Hawkinge and, as a front-line station throughout the last world war it saw action unfold day-by-day resulting in many men becoming decorated for valour and heroism.


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