THE JOURNAL OF THE C.I.V. IN SOUTH AFRICA.

Mackinnon, Major-Gen. W. H.


£95.00




1st ed., 1901. Xii + 252 pp., frontis., + 15 photo-plates + 3 maps & plans, of which 2 are plates and 1 has a route cold. Re-cased with new e.p.'s., retaining original blue cloth binding with gilt, red and white armorial to front; gilt title to spine; t.e.g., others uncut; 21 x 14cm. Spine faded with a couple of small scratches o/w V.G. Written by its Corps commander, this record of the City Imperial Volunteers focuses on the role played by its infantry section in South Africa. The unit was raised following 'Black Week' - the disastrous series of defeats inflicted on the British by the Boers at Colenso, Magersfontein and Stormberg. The C.I.V. sailed for South Africa in the first weeks of 1900, marched from the Orange River to the Vaal, and saw its first action at Doorn Kop, where it helped defeat the Boers in a skirmish. Marching round Pretoria, the unit formed part of General Ian Hamilton's force in the two-day action at Diamond Hill, where it sustained its first fatalities from Boer shellfire. The C.I.V. occupied the Boer town of Heibronm, but had to evacuate it when it was surrounded by forces led by the famous Boer Commando General Christiaan De Wet. The final actions of the C.I.V. in the war were a futile pursuit of the elusive De Wet by Kitchener. Originally written for private circulation, this journal is accompanied by ten appendices, including Nominal Rolls. It is illustrated with eighteen photographs, and three maps showing the actions at Doorn Kop, Diamond Hill and the C.I.V's march through Natal, the Orange Free State and the Transvaal. Scarce First Edition.


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