THE TRIAL OF COLONEL QUENTIN, OF THE TENTH, OR, PRINCE OF WALES’S OWN REGIMENT OF HUSSARS, BY A GENERAL COURT-MARTIAL, HELD AT WHITEHALL, ON MONDAY, THE 17TH OF OCTOBER, 1814; AND CONTINUED, BY ADJOURNMENT, TILL MONDAY, THE 31ST OF OCTOBER, 1814.

Gurney, Mr. W. B. (Short-Hand Writer to both Houses of Parliament).


£150.00




Gale, Curtis, and Fenner, 1st ed., 1814. Vii + 272 pp. 1 large fldg., chart. Original blue boards, grey spine; remains only of title-label to spine; edges uncut; 23 x 15cm. Some marks & stains to covers ; tape marks to e.p.'s (blank) ; only a little foxing & browning for the age of the book & o/w V.G. Bookplate. Published here is the complete trial of Colonel Quentin of the 10th or Prince of Wales’s Own Hussars as held in 1814. Colonel Quentin was on trial for four charges: Firstly, for neglecting and abandoning his duty as commanding officer on 10th January 1814 when on duty foraging in the Valley of Macoy in France. For leaving some of the divisions without orders or support when attacked by the enemy, resulting in some of his men and horses being taken prisoner. Secondly, for neglecting and abandoning his duties on 28th February 1814, the day after the Battle of Orthes when his Regiment was again engaged with the enemy. For not making effective enough attempts and personal exertions to co-operate with or support the advanced divisions of the 10th Hussars under his command. Thirdly for failing to make sufficient attempts and personal exertions when attacked by the enemy on 10th April 1814 during the Battle of Toulouse. For leaving some of his divisions, when under fire from the enemy, without orders. Fourthly, for general neglect of duty, by allowing a relaxed discipline to exist in the regiment under his command, when on foreign service; by which the reputation of the regiment suffered in the opinion of the commander of the forces and of the lieutenant-general commanding the cavalry, both of whom wrote letters of complaint. Colonel Quentin pleads not guilty to the charges and his trial pursues. This is a fascinating contemporary record that provides remarkable insight into military responsibility and discipline in 1814. It offers an intimate insight into the battles of Orthes and Toulouse. Another enthralling feature about this unusual item is the large folding Register of Regimental Courts-Martial, commencing 14th December, 1812 and continuing until 15th July 1814. This charts men’s names, troops, dates, their crimes, their sentence and the punishment received. Scarce First Edition, 1814.


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