WARRIOR RACE: THE BRITISH EXPERIENCE OF WAR FROM ROMAN TIMES TO THE PRESENT.

James, Lawrence.


£25.00




1st ed., 2001. 864 pp., photo & other plates. D.j., 24 x 16cm. Tiny blemish to margin of contents page o/w FINE. The author investigates the role played by war in the making of Britain. Drawing on the latest historical and archaeological research, as well as numerous untapped resources, he charts the full reach of British military history: the physical and psychological impact of Roman military occupation; the monarchy's struggle for mastery of the British Isles; the civil wars of the seventeenth century; the 'total war' experience of twentieth-century conflict. The author skilfully pulls together the momentous themes of his subject: he discusses how war has continually been a catalyst for social and political change; the rise and survival and reinvention of chivalry; the literary quest for a British epic; the concept of birth and breeding as the qualification for command in war; the issues of patriotism and Britain's anti-war tradition.


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