SEA LAW AND SEA POWER AS THEY WOULD BE AFFECTED BY RECENT PROPOSALS ; WITH REASONS AGAINST THOSE PROPOSALS.

Bowles, T. Gibson.


£25.00




1st.ed., 1910. Xvi + 296 pp. Red cloth; gilt ; t.e.g. 22 x 14cm. Some general foxing and wear to extremities of binding : GOOD. With the signature of R. F. Phillimore ' 1911; his copy. (Admiral Sir Richard Phillimore, GCB, KCMG, RN, b.23rd December 1864, was the son of Admiral Sir Augustus Phillimore and came from an old English naval family serving the Royal Navy from the days of Nelson to the 1950's. Sir Richard commanded the battlecruiser INFLEXIBLE at the Falklands in 1914 and at the bombardment of Turkish forts at the Dardanelles in 1915. He later flew his flag in the REPULSE when he commanded the First Battlecruiser Squadron as part of the Grand Fleet). In the years immediately before the First World War various naval conferences reached decisions which, in the words of the author, "surrender all that remains of ' British maritime rights as would be most effectual in war". The proposals in question were formulated at the Hague in 1907 and embodied in conventions then signed by British representatives which were carried further towards adoption at the London Naval Conference and the subsequent Declaration of London in 1909. The author examines the proposals and warns of the consequences if they were to come into force ' resulting in the Royal Navy fighting any future war with its hands tied. This important study describes the problems of maritime law prior to 1914 and its conflict with British Sea Power and the defence of the Empire. CONCERN OVER PRE-WWI PROPOSALS RELATING TO MARITIME LAW DURING HOSTILITIES. ADMIRAL SIR RICHARD PHILLIMORE'S COPY.


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