THE DIARY OF HENRY TEONGE, CHAPLAIN ON BOARD H.M.'s SHIPS ASSISTANCE, BRISTOL, AND ROYAL OAK, 1675-1679. TRANSCRIBED FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT AND EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES.

Manwaring, G. E. (Ed.).


£100.00




1st. thus, 1927. X + 318 + 4 (advt) pp., frontis + 7 other plates. Maroon cloth; gilt. 23 x 14cm. Spine sunned and with a light stain o/w V.G. With the signature of David Woodward's father, 1927. The diary of Henry Teonge, Chaplain, R.N. (1621-1690), written onboard three of the King's ships - ASSISTANCE, BRISTOL and ROYAL OAK between 1675 and 1679. Teonge first went to sea as chaplain to the ASSISTANCE, in the Mediterranean from May to November 1675. When the ship was paid off at Deptford the following year he lingered in London to indulge in his fondness for punch and good living before returning to his living at Spernall in Warwickshire. In March 1678 he left his parishioners once more and returned to London where he was presented to the King and eventually gained a warrant appointing him to the BRISTOL at Gravesend. On his arrival on board he and the officers "did much rejoice in punch and brandy" to celebrate his safe coming. Teonge's diary is not only entertaining but it also contains many valuable references and observations of shipboard life and customs including the number of shots fired in salute, the excessive amount of drinking, the nature of naval punishments, sanitary conditions, and the causes of death at sea. Aboard the BRISTOL he saw over the side 20 men including the captain between 7 February and 16 May 1679. At Port Mahon Teonge joins the ROYAL OAK until the ship paid off at Black Stakes in the Medway. For all Pepys's reforms, Teonge had to wait a long time before being paid off himself. Pepys had gone to the Tower accused of being involved in a Popish plot and the Navy suffered neglect until he was restored in 1684. The original manuscript of Teonge's diary was first published in 1825 but as Manwaring points out, that version omitted several passages and contained many faulty transcriptions whereas this version of 1927 prints the diary in full for the first time. Manwaring also provides an interesting introduction, notes, and eight illustrations. DIARY OF A 17TH CENTURY NAVAL CHAPLAIN. FIRST FULL & CORRECT TRANSCRIPTION.


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