FIGHTING FOR LIFE: AMERICAN MILITARY MEDICINE IN WORLD WAR II.

Cowdrey, Albert E.


£25.00




New York, 1st ed., 1994. Viii + 392 pp., photo-plates. D.j., 24 x 16cm. FINE. The demands of the Second World War, in all its varied theatres, provoked unparalleled medical advances in the years 1941-45 – a story of America's military medicine, untold until now. Servicemen, on land, sea and in the air, were assaulted by shrapnel, landmines, frostbite and malaria. The author explains how American medical units developed and implemented new technology under dire pressures so brilliantly that World War II became the first American war in which more men died in combat than of disease. Penicillin brought the antibiotic revolution to the battlefield, air evacuation plucked the wounded from jungles and deserts, and a unique system brought blood, still fresh from America, to our soldiers all over the world. Surgeons working just behind the front lines stabilized the worst cases, while physicians and public health experts suppressed epidemics and cured exotic diseases. Psychiatrists, nurses and medics all performed heroic feats amidst unspeakable conditions. Together they improvised medical miracles on the battlefields that could not have been imagined by practitioners in peacetime.


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