ART FROM THE TRENCHES: AMERICA'S UNIFORMED ARTISTS IN WORLD WAR I.

Cornebise, Alfred E.


£25.00




1st ed., 1991. Xii + 158 pp., photo-ills., + ills. D.j., 26 x 26cm. A faint hint of damp to the edge of some prelims o/w V.G.+. When the United States entered the First World War, eight American artists were commissioned to paint and draw it. They arrived in France in early 1918 with the American Expeditionary Forces and saw their role as one of preserving images of the entire aspect of American involvement in a way that photography could not. The Armistice came only a matter of months after the American artists arrived in France and they marched to the Rhineland with the American occupation forces, sketching along the way. Here is the first comprehensive account of the U.S. Army art programme in World War I. The sixty-six black-and-white pictures reproduced here are some of the approximately five hundred pieces of official AEF combat art, which shortly after the war were turned over to the Smithsonian Institution, where most of them remain.


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