THE ISSUE OF WAR: STATES, SOCIETIES, AND THE FAR EASTERN CONFLICT OF 1941-1945.

Thorne, Christopher.


£25.00




1st ed., 1985. Xix + 364 pp. D.j., 24 x 16cm. FINE. The Far Eastern war of 1941-1945 witnessed the first use of atomic weapons, greatly hastened the end of Western empires in Asia, and marked the rise of the United States to the position of the most powerful state the world had ever seen. This remarkable book weaves together both the entire network of international relations surrounding that conflict and the impact of the war on all the societies involved ' Indian as well as American; Australian and New Zealand as well as Japanese; Korean, Chinese and Southeast Asian as well as British, French and Dutch. The book brings together material gathered over many years in Asia, Australasia, Western Europe and the United States ' material which includes war-time films, broadcasts and newspapers, as well as large numbers of private and official papers. It represents a synthesis of military, diplomatic, economic, intellectual and social history, not only placing the war in the context of developments before 1941, but drawing out various patterns which cut across the familiar distinctions between Asia and the West or between Japan and the Western Allies. In doing so, it offers in effect a series of perspectives on major aspects of 'world history' in the 20th century, in a way which is likely to leave a lasting impression on the study of that subject.


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