BATTLE OF WITS: A HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY AND DECEPTION IN MODERN WARFARE.

Owen, David.


£20.00




1st ed., 1978. Xiii + 207 pp. D.j., 23 x 15cm. Lower corners bumped o/w V.G. Deception in battle is as old as the trumpets at Jericho, but as a specialised art it really came into its own with all the other scientific developments which have revolutionized warfare in the twentieth century. Deception was a war without bullets, a war which set out to confuse and mislead the enemy, to sap his morale and wear down his will to resist. It is the story of this war with which the author is concerned in this book. He briefly examines the few faltering footsteps which were made in this direction during the First World War and goes on to examine in depth the story of deception and psychological warfare in the Second World War and after. It is a remarkable story and one which may well come as a rude shock to those who cling to the idea that the British officer always fights like a gentleman.


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