ANDREW JACKSON HIGGINS AND THE BOATS THAT WON WORLD WAR II.

Strahan, Jerry E.


£30.00




Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge & London, 1st.ed., 1994. Xvii + 382 pp., frontis + 39 other photo-ills. D.j., 23 x 16cm. MINT. A biography of Andrew Jackson Higgins, the man who designed the LCVP (landing craft vehicle, personnel) that played such a vital role in the invasion of Normandy, the landings in Guadalcanal, North Africa, Leyte Gulf, and in thousands of amphibious landings across the Pacific. The US Navy had failed to come up with an effective tank landing craft after 20 years of trying. Higgins designed and constructed a craft in 61 hours - a feat that caused the bureau to despise him. In 1938 Higgins owned a small boatyard in New Orleans employing fewer than 75 men. By 1943 he owned seven plants and employed 20,000 workers. He gained a reputation for designing and building assault craft in record time, and as a result was awarded the largest shipbuilding and aircraft contracts in history. During WWII he built no less than 20,094 landing craft both large and small, including vessels built for the British Government, and this in addition to aircraft and other ships. BIOGRAPHY OF THE MAN WHO DESIGNED & BUILT ALLIED LANDING CRAFT IN WWII.


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